The Tap

Following the collapse of the economic system in Ireland, there has been a continuous need to increase taxes and broaden the tax base. With the involvement of the Troika (IMF/EU/ECB) attempting to rescue and bail out the country, a policy process for water charges was set into motion. Claims were made that this policy was a necessity.

However, the establishment of Irish water austerity was poorly managed and included excessive payments to consultants and bonuses for staff. Not only this, but dates and figures relating to the issuing of water charges changed frequently causing mistrust among the public. People are outraged at the lack of honesty and the way the situation has been handled. They now have to pay for one of the few things left they regard as their right.

The tap, situated on Gray Street, Dublin, is made from sewage piping which is used for transporting water under the city. It sits above a reservoir which can hold up to 16 gallons of water. An electrical pump sits inside the tap itself and continuously recycles the water from the reservoir and out the spout. This amount of water is related to the restrictions of water usage in each household.

The tap, situated on Gray Street, Dublin, is made from sewage piping which is used for transporting water under the city. It sits above a reservoir which can hold up to 16 gallons of water. An electrical pump sits inside the tap itself and continuously recycles the water from the reservoir and out the spout. This amount of water is related to the restrictions of water usage in each household.

The tap is used to identify just how much water people have used and how much of that water usage will be restricted. The pubic had a great response to the project.

The tap is used to identify just how much water people have used and how much of that water usage will be restricted. The pubic had a great response to the project.

Tap4

Wallpaper

The wallpaper displays a repeat pattern of an image of a water meter. The image was screen printed by hand onto 11 rolls of black wallpaper and then pasted onto the walls of a living room in a Dublin household. Very few people are able to identify the image as a water meter. The project highlights how these issues affect us though we're so unable to identify the route of the problem, we wouldn't recognize it even if it were plastered on the walls of our homes.

The wallpaper displays a repeat pattern of an image of a water meter. The image was screen printed by hand onto 11 rolls of black wallpaper and then pasted onto the walls of a living room in a Dublin household. Very few people are able to identify the image as a water meter. The project highlights how these issues affect us though we’re so unable to identify the route of the problem, we wouldn’t recognize it even if it were plastered on the walls of our homes.

Rachel Kelly is an artist studying Fine Art Sculpture at the National College of Art and Design, Dublin, Ireland. She is interested in the social and cultural aspects of the world we live in today and the current events that surround us.

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